Archive for Soups

Low Fat Soup Recipe from Elaine McGowan Weight Loss SpecialistThis soup is a perfect transition through the gamut of flavours as we move into autumn. By roasting the squash you will fill your home with a wonderful aroma. Winter squash, like other colourful veggies, are rich in carotenes. Carotenes are the compounds that give winter squashes like butternut and pumpkin and carrots their yellow, orange or red colours. They are powerful plant components that have demonstrated a potential benefit in cancer prevention and in reducing the development of cardiovascular disease and diabetes.

Ingredients (serves 4)

  • 6 large tomatoes
  • 2 red onions
  • 1 large butternut squash
  • 1 stick of celery
  • 1 medium red pepper, deseeded
  • 1 carrot
  • 2 cloves of garlic
  • 1 red chilli, deseeded

Method

1. Preheat oven to 190 degrees, gas mark 5.

2. Cut tomatoes, squash, onion, pepper, celery and carrot into chunks and finely dice the garlic and chilli.

3. Place all the vegetables into a large roasting tin.

4. Season generously with salt, pepper and toss together.

5. Place in oven for 45 minutes turning evenly every 15 minutes.

6. Place vegetables in food processor with 500ml of boiling water and blitz until smooth.

7. Pour through a sieve into a large deep saucepan, pressing down with a ladle to squash the vegetable puree through the mesh.

8. Add another 500ml of boiling water to the smooth soup. Bring to the boil and simmer for 2-3 minutes.

9. Season to taste.

Low FODMAP diet tip: Make this a low FODMAP recipe by omitting the garlic and onion.

To make an appointment to discuss your weight loss needs and concerns, please contact your nearest Elaine McGowan Dietetic Clinic.

Categories : Recipes, Soups
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The worst time of year for colds and fl u’s is February
and March. Boost your immune system with plenty
of vitamin rich vegetables and fruits. This recipe
packs a punch with 7 different vegetables for a variety
of immune boosting antioxidants.
At only 265Kcals a serving this is also a delicious,
very low calorie recipe to help you shed a few festive
pounds. The high fi bre lentils also provide a good
source of plant protein that will keep you feeling
satisfi ed and fuller for longer. Having soup, with a
little protein, is a great option for lunch as it will give
you a steady source of energy and help prevent the
4pm coffee and chocolate craving.

lentil-soupThe worst time of year for colds and flu’s is February and March. Boost your immune system with plenty of vitamin rich vegetables and fruits. This recipe packs a punch with 7 different vegetables for a variety of immune boosting antioxidants.

At only 265Kcals a serving this is also a delicious, very low calorie recipe to help you shed a few festive pounds. The high fibre lentils also provide a good source of plant protein that will keep you feeling satisfied and fuller for longer. Having soup, with a little protein, is a great option for lunch as it will give you a steady source of energy and help prevent the 4pm coffee and chocolate craving.

Ingredients (serves 6)

  • 2tbsp olive oil
  • 1 leek, white part chopped
  • 2 cloves garlic, crushed
  • 2tsp curry powder
  • 1tsp g round cumin
  • 1tsp g aram masala
  • 1 litre vegetable stock
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 185g brown lentils
  • 450g sweet potato, cubed
  • 1 tin chopped tomatoes
  • 1tbsp tomato paste
  • 2 courgettes, sliced into half moons
  • 200g broccoli, divided into small florets
  • 1 carrot, diced
  • 100g frozen peas
  • 1 litre vegetable stock
  • 1tbsp chopped fresh coriander
  • Spiced yoghurt:
  • 250g plain yoghurt
  • 1tbsp chopped fresh mint
  • 1 clove garlic, crushed
  • 5 drops Tabasco

Method

1. Heat the oil in a pot and gently cook the leek , carrot and garlic for 4 minutes. Add the spices and cook for 1 minute.

2. Add the stock, bay leaf, lentils, tinned tomato, paste and sweet potato. Bring to the boil, then reduce to a simmer and cook for 15 minutes.

3. Add the courgettes, broccoli and stock and simmer for a further 10 minutes.

4. Add the peas and cook for 3 minutes, stir through coriander. Season.

5. Mix together the spiced yoghurt and serve a dollop on each serving of soup.

Categories : Recipes, Soups
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The maximum recommended daily allowance for salt is 6g, which is about a teaspoon. Any more than this poses a threat to our health,
especially blood pressure. Statistics from Safe Food show that we are consuming on average twice this amount.
The most common culprit is ‘hidden’ salts in processed foods. Stock cubes and powders are one of the saltiest products that we use, especially in the cold season when we are making soups and stews. When buying stock cubes choose a brand that has low salt and additive free versions.
Making your own vegetable stock also helps prevent food waste as you can use up veggies that may be looking a little wilted and sad.
To make your own vegetable stock take onions, carrots and celery as a base and if you have tomatoes, fennel, parsley stalks, rosemary stalks, thyme and leeks add these too. Avoid smelly
vegetables like cabbage, broccoli and cauliflower. Throw in some
dried aromatics like bay leaves, peppercorns and some mustard
seeds if you like a little heat. Cover with plenty of water, bring to the boil then simmer for 20 minutes. Scoop off any scum floating on the surface, strain and discard the vegetables. Use or freeze as needed.
To make a chicken stock, simply gather your chicken bones and freeze them until you have enough. Add to the basic vegetable
stock recipe and simmer for 45 minutes. Again, scoop off any scum
and strain. If you need a stronger tasting stock, you can reduce it down by boiling after you have strained it. This would be advisable for sauces and gravies but not necessary for soup.

make-you-own-stockThe maximum recommended daily allowance for salt is 6g, which is about a teaspoon. Any more than this poses a threat to our health, especially blood pressure. Statistics from Safe Food show that we are consuming on average twice this amount.

The most common culprit is ‘hidden’ salts in processed foods. Stock cubes and powders are one of the saltiest products that we use, especially in the cold season when we are making soups and stews. When buying stock cubes choose a brand that has low salt and additive free versions.

Making your own vegetable stock also helps prevent food waste as you can use up veggies that may be looking a little wilted and sad.

To make your own vegetable stock take onions, carrots and celery as a base and if you have tomatoes, fennel, parsley stalks, rosemary stalks, thyme and leeks add these too. Avoid smelly vegetables like cabbage, broccoli and cauliflower. Throw in some dried aromatics like bay leaves, peppercorns and some mustard seeds if you like a little heat. Cover with plenty of water, bring to the boil then simmer for 20 minutes. Scoop off any scum floating on the surface, strain and discard the vegetables. Use or freeze as needed.

To make a chicken stock, simply gather your chicken bones and freeze them until you have enough. Add to the basic vegetable stock recipe and simmer for 45 minutes. Again, scoop off any scum and strain. If you need a stronger tasting stock, you can reduce it down by boiling after you have strained it. This would be advisable for sauces and gravies but not necessary for soup.

Categories : Recipes, Soups
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Jan
19

Hungarian Goulash

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goulashBeef is lower in saturated fat than lamb so is a better option for stews.By not browning the meat we are also saving on fat and calories. By using lots of peppers and red onions, we are also upping the veggie quota.

Mushrooms and courgettes also work very well in this recipe. Tinned tomatoes are rich in antioxidant lycopene and a handy store cupboard ingredient.
This recipe freezes very well so you will always have something warming and nutritious on hand rather than reaching for the take away menu or microwave meal. Especially good served with toasted buckwheat groats and steamed green beans for extra fi bre and vitamins.

Beef is lower in saturated fat than lamb so is a better option for stews.By not browning the meat we are also saving on fat and calories. By using lots of peppers and red onions, we are also upping the veggie quota.

Mushrooms and courgettes also work very well in this recipe. Tinned tomatoes are rich in antioxidant lycopene and a handy store cupboard ingredient.

This recipe freezes very well so you will always have something warming and nutritious on hand rather than reaching for the take away menu or microwave meal. Especially good served with toasted buckwheat groats and steamed green beans for extra fibre and vitamins.

Ingredients (serves 8 )

  • 1.5kg stewing beef in cubes
  • Sunflower oil, for frying
  • 2 red onions, sliced into thin wedges
  • 2tbls flour
  • 1bls paprika
  • 3 tins chopped tomatoes
  • 2tbls tomato puree
  • 2 red peppers, cut into thin strips
  • 2 yellow peppers, cut into thin strips
  • 2tbls chopped fl at-leaf parsley
  • 200ml low fat crème fraiche or
  • sour cream
  • Salt and pepper

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Categories : Recipes, Soups, Uncategorized
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Jan
19

Winter Warmers – Tip!

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“While stews and casseroles are hearty and wholesome it is very easy to rack up the saturated fat content when you brown off the meat in oil. Even if you have a good non stick pan, you still tend to use a fairly large quantity of oil.
So I have experimented with not browning the meat at all and just adding the raw,unbrowned meat to the pot. And surprisingly, it works very well as a good recipe and the gentle cooking process will still create complex flavours.
So skip this step to save time and calories. Another tip for reducing saturated fat is removing any chicken skin. You really aren’t missing out on anything as the skin goes rubbery during the long stewing. And lastly, instead of using gallons of cream, use mostly stock, tomatoes and wine as your liquid. Add a little half fat crème fraiche just before serving for a creamy finish without all the fat”

“While stews and casseroles are hearty and wholesome it is very easy to rack up the saturated fat content when you brown off the meat in oil. Even if you have a good non stick pan, you still tend to use a fairly large quantity of oil.

So I have experimented with not browning the meat at all and just adding the raw,unbrowned meat to the pot. And surprisingly, it works very well as a good recipe and the gentle cooking process will still create complex flavours.

So skip this step to save time and calories. Another tip for reducing saturated fat is removing any chicken skin. You really aren’t missing out on anything as the skin goes rubbery during the long stewing. And lastly, instead of using gallons of cream, use mostly stock, tomatoes and wine as your liquid. Add a little half fat crème fraiche just before serving for a creamy finish without all the fat”

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Jan
07

Warming Soups for Winter Days

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soupThe following soups are very low in calories, full of nourishment and goodness. They are ideal low calorie fillers for this cold spell – recipes include Carrot, Orange and Coriander Soup, Tomato Soup, Chicken and Mushroom Soup, Vegetable Consommé and Cauliflower and Leek Soup.

Carrot, Orange and Coriander Soup

  • 3 medium carrots (360g) chopped
  • 1 medium onion (120g) finely chopped
  • 1 chicken stock cube crumbled
  • 1 orange
  • 1 tablesp tomato puree
  • 450 ml water
  • 2 tablesp fresh coriander chopped
  • Salt and pepper to taste

1. Combine carrots, onion, water and stock cube in a large saucepan. Bring to the boil, then reduce heat. Cover and simmer for 5 minutes or until the vegetables are tender.

2. Add the grated rind and juice of 1 orange and tomato puree. Blend until smooth.

3. Return to saucepan, reheated without boiling and add chopped coriander.

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Categories : Recipes, Soups
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soup

Elaine’s recipe this month uses broccoli, which is high in vitamin C (see above for more on vitamin C) and cannellini beans which are a great source of fibre.

This heartwarming soup will keep you full for longer while delivering plenty of nutritional benefits, including the immune boosting benefits of garlic.

Ingredients (serves 6):

  • 210 g (7 oz) dried cannellini (white) beans, washed and soaked overnight
  • 750 g (1 1/2 lb) broccoli, washed and chopped (use florets and stems)
  • 6 tbsp extra virgin olive oil
  • 120 g (4 oz) bacon, chopped
  • 6 garlic cloves, chopped
  • Lo-salt and pepper

Method

  1. Drain the soaking beans and put into a saucepan with approximately 2 litres of water and slowly bring to the boil.
  2. Cook beans for 1 1/2 hours, then add the broccoli stems and florets and cook for about 10 minutes.
  3. Next, pass everything else through a foodmill (do not blend in a processor as the texture will become too thick) or, if you don’t have a foodmill in your kitchen, simply mash the ingredients with a potato masher.
  4. Reheat the purée and add lo-salt to taste.
  5. Meanwhile, heat oil in a pan and fry the bacon and garlic until slightly golden.
  6. Pour the bacon and garlic into the saucepan with broccoli puree and mix well.
  7. Sprinkle with pepper and add a splash of cream to serve.

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About Elaine

Elaine graduated from Trinity College with a B.Sc., (Hons) in Human Nutrition and Dietetics. She gained wide experience working as clinical nutritionist in several hospitals prior to establishing her first private dietetic clinic in 1992.

Private Practice Experience
Elaine has gained vast experience specialising in providing private individual dietetic consultations for her clients in her clinics for the past 17 years. In recent years, her main areas of interest are weight management, obesity, diabetes, heart disease and nutrition and gastro-enterology.

Elaine is an active member of the INDI and was chairperson of the Irish Nutrition and Dietetic weight management interest group from 2005 to 2007.

Dietetic and Nutrition Consultancy
Elaine has provided dietetic consultancy to a wide range of industries including private hospitals, hotels and catering companies. She has designed, piloted, implemented and coordinated workplace wellbeing programmes for several prominent companies and large international corporations.