Archive for FODMAPs

May
03

Simple low FODMAP Chow Mein Dish

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Low FODMAP Diet ReciptesIngredients (serves 2)

  • 2 chicken breast fi llets, sliced (or meat of your choice)
  • 4 tablespoons dark soy sauce
  • 4 tablespoons light soy sauce
  • 4 tablespoons oyster sauce
  • 1 tablespoon cornfl our
  • 3 tablespoons oil
  • 1 bag beansprouts
  • 3 spring onions (green part), chopped
  • 1 carrot, diced
  • 1 teaspoon fi nely chopped ginger
  • 150g green beans
  • 1 teaspoon sugar
  • 1 teaspoon ground white pepper

Method

1. Place meat in 1 tablespoon dark soy sauce, 1 tablespoon light soy sauce, 1 tablespoon oyster sauce and cornflour in the fridge for 4 hours to marinate.

2. Bring a pot of water to the boil and cook noodlesaccording to packet instructions. Once cooked, run under cold water to prevent sticking.
3. Heat oil in wok until very hot and fry meat until cooked. Add beansprouts, spring onions, carrot, ginger and green beans to the wok and cook for 5 minutes. Add to the cooked noodles and the meat.

4. Stir and add the remaining dark soy sauce, light soy sauce, oyster sauce, sugar and pepper. Stir thoroughly and serve.

Categories : FODMAP, FODMAPs, Recipes
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May
07

Take Control! of Irritable Bowel Syndrome

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Elaine specialises in the low FODMAP diet and has been implementing the diet successfully in her practice
since November 2010. Elaine has seen a significant improvement in her patients’ symptoms since introducing
the low FODMAP diet and is having continued success with this diet.

The low FODMAP diet is the latest treatment for IBS in Ireland and is now accepted and recommended as one of
the most effective dietary therapies for functional gut disorders such as IBS.

The word FODMAP itself is an acronym referring to the following;Fermentable, Oligo-saccharides, Di-saccharides, Monosaccarides and Polyols.

The major FODMAPs are fructose, fructans, galactans, polyols and lactose. In people with gastrointestinal symptoms, a diet high in FODMAPs can cause diarrhoea and/or constipation, bloating, wind, nausea and abdominal pain.

Removing foods high in FODMAPs from the diet is effective in improving symptoms of people with functional gut disorders like Irritable Bowel Syndrome.

To make an appointment for the low FODMAP dietary programme please contact your nearest Elaine McGowan Dietetic Clinic.

Categories : FODMAPs, IBS
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Since my teens I have always suffered with my bowel and would frequently experience stomach pains, especially if I had just eaten a meal regardless of the portion size. I would never have been able to go out for a meal late in the evening. The symptoms also got bad when on holidays as my diet would be different and I would be eating out more.

In 2011 I was advised by my doctor that the symptoms I had linked to IBS (irritable bowel syndrome). I had
tried all types of diets, high fibre, low fibre and I had significantly reduced dairy products from my diet. I was taking medication to reduce the spasms in my stomach and using remedies for diarrhoea or constipation depending on the day.

I was recommended by my Doctor to attend Elaine McGowan. Elaine was very friendly and immediately put my mind at rest. Elaine explained the low FODMAP diet that I was going to use. She provided clear guidelines for the diet and advised that I would need to be strict on the diet for 4 weeks and then we would start to re- introduce foods.

Elaine provided a list of the foods that I could eat and where I could purchase these foods. Being a very fussy eater I didn’t think that I could obey the guidelines for 4 weeks. Week 1 was very hard adjusting to new foods and when doing my weekly shop reading the ingredients in foods.

Once I got started, I immediately noticed a difference in my health, no stomach pains and I had so much energy. I feel so much healthier. As an added bonus I am now able to eat out later than usual with no side effects.

As the weeks have gone by I have not looked back to my old lifestyle, I am so happy that I went to get dietary advice, definitely a lifestyle change. I would highly recommend a visit to Elaine.

“Over the years, I’ve tried all kinds of diets – wheat-free, gluten-free, highfibre, low-fi bre – and thought I had finally identified the triggers for my lingering IBS.

I thought I knew what caused the bloating, discomfort and pain, but I was wrong. In my wildest imagination, I never thought that a simple, healthy food like an apple could be a problem until Elaine told me about a dietary therapy
for IBS called the low FODMAP diet.

Researchers have pinpointed a number of molecules in food (called FODMAPs) which are poorly absorbed in people with IBS. The list of my trigger foods included some of my favourites – onions, garlic, apples, honey– and under Elaine’s supervision and guidance, I tried rationing some and eliminating others.

I kept a food diary and, within four weeks, all my symptoms had improved. And the improvement was lasting. Occasionally, I’ll let the diet slip or will feel a little off after eating out or indulging during a holiday, but it’s easy enough to get back on track.

I miss my apple a day – and the onions and garlic – but the low FODMAP regime has not been very difficult to follow. I have cut out pasta and most bread, but find that I get away with a little wheat at breakfast and, best of all for this sweet-toothed person, some chocolate and ice cream.

There is still plenty of choice at mealtimes: meat, fish, eggs, tofu, basmati rice and potatoes, plus a carefully chosen selection of fruit and veg. For me, coffee is an irritant too, but I still haven’t succeeded in kicking the early-morning
caffeine habit.In the meantime, though, I find the low FODMAP diet very helpful, and refreshingly easy to follow.”

Patient Story: Ciara Millar,
Ir ritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) -
dietary success
“Growing up in my teens I suffered from problems with my
stomach and my bowel. I suffered from vomiting, burping
after eating and intense stomach cramps and bloating after
eating. The symptoms of these problems got extremely
worse in my mid 20’s when I started my career. Stress
aggravated the problems. My life became centred around
these problems because I found it hard to make plans to go
out on a night out, to go on fl ights and to go out for dinner.
In my mid-twenties my symptoms had become so severe
that I made an appointment via my G.P. to attend a
Gastroenterologist and I had a colonoscopy procedure to
check my bowel and a g astroscopy procedure to check my
stomach. I was diagnosed as having chronic irritable bowel
syndrome. I was also diagnosed as having refl ux. I am now
31 and since I fi rst had these procedures I have had them
twice since then. I always tried to manage my symptoms
by eating more healthy, not eating takeaways, cutting out
white bread, cutting out and down on certain alcohol and
exercising. I always tended to be worse when I went on
holidays and blamed it on the fl ights.
In the last few months I was almost afraid to eat because
everytime I did eat the symptoms of refl ux would return
and the cramps I was experiencing from my bowel became
intolerable. My symptoms were so severe this year that I
was vomiting a lot at night and in the morning, suffering
from stomach cramps every time I ate. I no longer
socialised because I was afraid of being sick when I went
out with friends. I missed days in work because of what
I was experiencing. My mood swings also changed and I

“Growing up in my teens I suffered from problems with my stomach and my bowel. I suffered from vomiting, burping after eating and intense stomach cramps and bloating after eating. The symptoms of these problems got extremely worse in my mid 20’s when I started my career. Stress aggravated the problems. My life became centred around these problems because I found it hard to make plans to go out on a night out, to go on flights and to go out for dinner.

In my mid-twenties my symptoms had become so severe that I made an appointment via my G.P. to attend a Gastroenterologist and I had a colonoscopy procedure to check my bowel and a g astroscopy procedure to check my stomach. I was diagnosed as having chronic irritable bowel syndrome. I was also diagnosed as having reflux. I am now 31 and since I first had these procedures I have had them twice since then. I always tried to manage my symptoms by eating more healthy, not eating takeaways, cutting out white bread, cutting out and down on certain alcohol and exercising. I always tended to be worse when I went on holidays and blamed it on the flights.

In the last few months I was almost afraid to eat because everytime I did eat the symptoms of reflux would return and the cramps I was experiencing from my bowel became intolerable. My symptoms were so severe this year that I was vomiting a lot at night and in the morning, suffering from stomach cramps every time I ate. I no longer socialised because I was afraid of being sick when I went out with friends. I missed days in work because of what I was experiencing. My mood swings also changed and I wasn’t the happy go lucky person I always had been.

I was advised by my gastroenterologist to attend Elaine McGowan. That day I met with Elaine, she was sympathetic to what I had been going through all these years and she said that she would help me. My family and friends had been telling me for months that I couldn’t continue to put up with the problems that I had been having for years.

Elaine introduced me to the low FODMAP diet and explained it to me in detail. This particular diet lists out certain foods that you can and can’t eat. Within two days of using this diet I noticed an enormous change. I have been on this diet now for over two months and I can honestly say that is has changed my life.

I can still eat a lot of the food groups that I have always loved. I just had to make certain changes. The symptoms of both reflux and chronic IBS have disappeared completely. I now realise that it is normal not to get cramps or feel nauseous every time I eat. I am happier in myself, the dark circles are gone from under my eyes, I am sleeping better and I have more energy than ever before because of the foods I am now eating on this diet.

Thank you Elaine so much for helping me have a normal life again.”

Oct
04

What are the FODMAPs?

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FODMAPs are found in
the foods we eat. FODMAP
is an acronym referring
to Fermentable, Oligosaccharides,
Di- saccharides,
Mono-saccharides and
Polyols (FODMAPs).
The major FODMAPs
are fructose, fructans,
galactans, polyols and
lactose. In people with
gastrointestinal symptoms,
a diet high in FODMAPs
can cause diarrhoea and/or
constipation, bloating, wind,
nausea and abdominal pain.
Removing foods high in FODMAPs
from the diet is effective in
improving symptoms of people with
functional gut disorders like IBS.
Low FODMAP information
Please be aware that the low
FODMAP diet is a new dietary
treatment option to Ireland. The
majority of information on low
FODMAPs available in books and
on the Internet may be out of date
and inaccurate.
FODMAP-trained Dietitians
Elaine specialises in the low
FODMAP diet and fi nds it a most
effective treatment for functional
gut disorders particularly IBS.
Elaine is one of few dieticians
trained in the low FODMAP diet in
the Republic of Ireland.
The diet is most effective when
FODMAP-trained dietitians
provide dietary advice. It has been
shown that patients that had seen
a FODMAP-trained dietitian
reported signifi cant improvement in
symptoms after being on the diet.
To make an appointment for the
low FODMAP dietary programme
please contact your nearest Elaine
McGowan Dietetic Clinic (contact
numbers listed on the back of this
newsletter) or please go to
www.emgdc.ie

FODMAPs are found in the foods we eat. FODMAP is an acronym referring to Fermentable, Oligosaccharides, Di-saccharides, Mono-saccharides and Polyols (FODMAPs).

The major FODMAPs are fructose, fructans, galactans, polyols and lactose. In people with gastrointestinal symptoms, a diet high in FODMAPs can cause diarrhoea and/or constipation, bloating, wind, nausea and abdominal pain.

Removing foods high in FODMAPs from the diet is effective in improving symptoms of people with functional gut disorders like IBS.

Low FODMAP information

Please be aware that the low FODMAP diet is a new dietary treatment option to Ireland. The majority of information on low FODMAPs available in books and on the Internet may be out of date and inaccurate.

FODMAP-trained Dietitians

Elaine specialises in the low FODMAP diet and finds it a most effective treatment for functional gut disorders particularly IBS. Elaine is one of few dieticians trained in the low FODMAP diet in the Republic of Ireland.

The diet is most effective when FODMAP-trained dietitians provide dietary advice. It has been shown that patients that had seen a FODMAP-trained dietitian reported significant improvement in symptoms after being on the diet.

To make an appointment for the low FODMAP dietary programme please contact your nearest Elaine McGowan Dietetic Clinic  or please go to www.emgdc.ie

Categories : FODMAPs
Comments (1)

About Elaine

Elaine graduated from Trinity College with a B.Sc., (Hons) in Human Nutrition and Dietetics. She gained wide experience working as clinical nutritionist in several hospitals prior to establishing her first private dietetic clinic in 1992.

Private Practice Experience
Elaine has gained vast experience specialising in providing private individual dietetic consultations for her clients in her clinics for the past 17 years. In recent years, her main areas of interest are weight management, obesity, diabetes, heart disease and nutrition and gastro-enterology.

Elaine is an active member of the INDI and was chairperson of the Irish Nutrition and Dietetic weight management interest group from 2005 to 2007.

Dietetic and Nutrition Consultancy
Elaine has provided dietetic consultancy to a wide range of industries including private hospitals, hotels and catering companies. She has designed, piloted, implemented and coordinated workplace wellbeing programmes for several prominent companies and large international corporations.