Archive for Fibre

Jan
19

Oats Porridge – The Breakfast Superfood

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It might not be a sexy new superfood,
but oats are one of the healthiest foods
you can eat. It also grows extremely well
in Ireland so you can buy local and even
organic porridge oats if you prefer. Plus it
is far more economical than junky, sugary
breakfast cereals.
Coming into winter a warm bowl
of porridge in the morning is a comforting
way to ease yourself into the day. Many
people claim that a bowl of porridge
‘sets them up’ for the day. And they are
absolutely right. Oats, unlike other grains,
has a very high level of soluble fi bre, called
beta glucan. This fi bre forms a gel in
the digestive tract that has many positive
effects. The most measurable is probably
the lowering of LDL (‘bad’) cholesterol.
It does this by trapping the cholesterol in
the digestive tract and moving it out of the
body. Avenanthramides are antioxidants
in oats that reduce the build up of plaque
in the artery walls and thereby prevent
hardening of the arteries, another factor in
heart disease.
The fi bre in oats helps to make it a
slow releasing carbohydrate, which keeps
blood sugar nice and steady. This is vital
for diabetics and for weightloss, but also for
sustained energy and good brain function
and concentration. Oats are also rich in
B vitamins which are vital for the nervous
system and brain function. Along with
selenium, an important antioxidant for
healthy brain chemistry.
New studies show that beta glucan,
the soluble fi bre in oats, also helps immune
cells in the body to treat bacterial infection
more effectively, facilitating quicker healing
and recovery. This is important for all of
us struggling with colds and fl us, but even
more important if you have a longterm
illness. The high levels of zinc in oats also
contribute to a healthy immune system.
There are also several antioxidants
and phytonutrients present in oats that have
powerful anti cancer actions. Selenium,
along with happy brain chemistry, is
involved in DNA repair and is associated
with a reduced risk of colon cancer. Ferulic
acid is another antioxidant that protects the
colon from cancer.

It might not be a sexy new superfood, but oats are one of the healthiest foods you can eat. It also grows extremely well in Ireland so you can buy local and even organic porridge oats if you prefer. Plus it is far more economical than junky, sugary breakfast cereals.

Coming into winter a warm bowl of porridge in the morning is a comforting way to ease yourself into the day. Many people claim that a bowl of porridge ‘sets them up’ for the day. And they are absolutely right. Oats, unlike other grains, has a very high level of soluble fibre, called beta glucan. This fibre forms a gel in the digestive tract that has many positive effects. The most measurable is probably the lowering of LDL (‘bad’) cholesterol. It does this by trapping the cholesterol in the digestive tract and moving it out of the body. Avenanthramides are antioxidants in oats that reduce the build up of plaque in the artery walls and thereby prevent hardening of the arteries, another factor in heart disease.

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Jan
07

Did you know?…Fibre

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Research shows that the majority
of us are not getting enough
fi bre in our diet and this should
form one of the essential parts of
our diet for good health. One of
the easiest ways to increase fi bre
intake is to use brown pasta
or rice instead of white (and the
same goes for bread), in addition
to including more fruit and
vegetables at each meal (aim
for two at breakfast, two at lunch
and two at dinner to reach your
5+ a day). Also, another thing I
urge clients to do is to experiment
with different pulses, which are
very high in fi bre, such as chick
peas, kidney beans or green lentils
(delicious when cooked in stock!).

Diet and Weight Loss - PulsesResearch shows that the majority of us are not getting enough fibre in our diet and this should form one of the essential parts of our diet for good health. One of the easiest ways to increase fibre intake is to use brown pasta or rice instead of white (and the same goes for bread), in addition to including more fruit and vegetables at each meal (aim for two at breakfast, two at lunch and two at dinner to reach your 5+ a day).

Also, another thing I urge clients to do is to experiment with different pulses, which are very high in fibre, such as chick peas, kidney beans or green lentils (delicious when cooked in stock!).

Categories : Fibre, Healthy Eating
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About Elaine

Elaine graduated from Trinity College with a B.Sc., (Hons) in Human Nutrition and Dietetics. She gained wide experience working as clinical nutritionist in several hospitals prior to establishing her first private dietetic clinic in 1992.

Private Practice Experience
Elaine has gained vast experience specialising in providing private individual dietetic consultations for her clients in her clinics for the past 17 years. In recent years, her main areas of interest are weight management, obesity, diabetes, heart disease and nutrition and gastro-enterology.

Elaine is an active member of the INDI and was chairperson of the Irish Nutrition and Dietetic weight management interest group from 2005 to 2007.

Dietetic and Nutrition Consultancy
Elaine has provided dietetic consultancy to a wide range of industries including private hospitals, hotels and catering companies. She has designed, piloted, implemented and coordinated workplace wellbeing programmes for several prominent companies and large international corporations.