Archive for Exercise Tips

May
03

Great Limerick Run

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Great Limerick RunElaine is currently working as Sports Nutritionist for the Great Limerick Run in conjunction with Barrington’s Hospital, who are sponsoring the event. This is a large sporting event, which incorporates 4 different challenges encouraging individuals to achieve their own personal goals by running, jogging or walking. In it’s third year, it has over 8000 participants each year.

For more information visit www.greatlimerickrun.com

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Dec
18

Walk to Fitness

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Regular walking is perhaps one of the best forms of activity as it is at a moderate intensity and therefore it impacts positively on the risk factors for heart disease, obesity, diabetes and even some cancers. Perhaps one of the real benefits is that people perceive exercise as relatively easy, so they are more likely to get up and go out for a walk as opposed to visiting a gym.

Walkers report that they feel better about themselves, have more confidence, are more alert and enjoy better sleeping patterns – surely that’s reason enough! Also, while it’s true that walking doesn’t burn calories as quickly as jogging or other high-intensity activities, dozens of studies have shown it to be a very effective weight-loss tool.

A study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association found that brisk walking is very effective for reducing deep abdominal fat, the most dangerous kind of fat in terms of heart health.

Get Going this Christmas & New Year

The American College of Sports Medicine recommends that a person should accumulate at least 30 minutes of
moderately intensive physical activity on most, preferably all, days of the week. Next month we will show you how to challenge yourself further each time, by introducing variety into your walks, using new walking techniques and even perhaps trying a slow jog for some.

“If someone has not exercised for a while, I suggest that they start with 30 minutes, but then build up to 50 minutes by the end of the Christmas holidays,” says Elaine.

“This means that they are starting the New Year with good habits already in place!” Remember that it is always sensible to talk to your GP before embarking on a new exercise programme, particularly if you have a history of medical problems.

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Oct
23

Exercise Corner: Get Moving… …TODAY

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Aerobic exercise such as walking, jogging, swimming and cycling is great for your health. This exercise does not need to be performed at high intensity; you can go at a slow steady pace and build your fitness levels up over time. Aerobic exercise is beneficial for lowering your body fat, losing weight and increasing heart fitness. Exercise is essential as you get older to maintain muscle mass and bone strength.

Scheduling regular exercise into your week helps reduce stress levels, increases concentration and improves the quality of your sleep.

Practical Tip:

Why not put a reminder in your phone or diary for weekly exercise. Too often these days time slips by while on the computer or watching television.
Don’t become a couch potato, try to get moving today!

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Oct
05

Exercise Corner: Get Moving

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exercise-tipsOsteoporosis means porous bones. It is a silent disease that is usually not diagnosed until a fracture/s, the Irish Osteoporosis Society it is estimated that 300,000 people in Ireland have osteoporosis. One in 5 men and 1 in 2 women over 50 will develop a fracture due to osteoporosis in their lifetime. The disease can even affect children.

Exercise is an essential part of keeping bones healthy and strong. President of the Irish Osteoporosis Society, Professor Moira O’ Brien recommends 30 minutes of daily weight bearing exercises for all age groups, including senior citizens.

Weight bearing exercises includes any physical activity where you have to support the weight of your own body such as dancing, running, walking, tennis, squash and football. Walking which is the preferred exercise of many people is a weightbearing exercise, however it is important to change your pace intermittently.

Some activities can be done in many places, and can be included in a busy daily routine, for example;
Stair climbing is good for your spine and hip but should only be done by those who are steady on their feet and using a rail. Ten times up and down an average flight of stairs (10-12 steps) are a third of your daily weight-bearing
requirements.

Intermittent jogging is great for people who f nd running or jogging too strenuous. Walk for a few minutes and then jog for 30-60 seconds. This helps to increase bone density (strength) in the spine and hips but your doctor should
medically clear you.

Resistance exercises are also good for bone health, these are exercises, which involve lifting weights with your arms or legs. Children should be encouraged to do 60 minutes of moderate-high impact exercise daily (30 minutes weight-bearing and 30 minutes for overall general health). This is especially important prior to puberty as bone strength can be significantly increased to reduce the risk of osteoporosis in later life.

Exercises that become part of your lifestyle routine are always best. The advice of the Osteoporosis Society is to pick an exercise that you enjoy doing and you’re more likely to continue with this. Doing a mix of different exercises is ideal. Check out the Irish Osteoporosis Society website for further information www.irishosteoporosis.ie

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Jan
19

Exercise Corner: Get Moving

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The Irish Heart Foundation recommends that we exercise a minimum of 30 minutes 3 times a week at an intensity level that gets our heart rate up. This should be increased to 30 minutes 5 times a week. To encourage you here are some of the benefi ts of regular
exercise:
Reduces high blood pressure and the risk of heart disease
Reduces the risk of stroke
Improves posture, bone strength and density
Reduces the risk of Type 2 Diabetes
Boost immunity to diseases and infection
Helps the body cope with stress,depression and anxiety
Helps maintain a healthy weight andbuilds lean muscle tissue
Improves slee p and concentration levels
Walking is the most recommended form of exercise as it is low impact, economical and easy to do. There are now many walking clubs and routes that can help you feel motivated and monitor your progress.
Checkout the Irish Heart Foundation’s Sli na Slainte (Path to Health) walking programmes www.irishheart.ie
Dance classes have also become a very popular way to stay fit while having fun. There are ‘cardio Salsa’ classes available in many VEC colleges, community centres and dance schools. These are designed so that you don’t need a partner or any special clothes.
The largest dance school in Ireland, Stepping Out (www.steppingout.ie) provides over 30 different Salsa Slims classes. The classes last for an hour and are taught by energetic, fun instructors. The aim is to have a good workout while learning to dance and having fun.

The Irish Heart Foundation recommends that we exercise a minimum of 30 minutes 3 times a week at an intensity level that gets our heart rate up. This should be increased to 30 minutes 5 times a week. To encourage you here are some of the benefi ts of regular exercise:

  • Reduces high blood pressure and the risk of heart disease
  • Reduces the risk of stroke
  • Improves posture, bone strength and density
  • Reduces the risk of Type 2 Diabetes
  • Boost immunity to diseases and infection
  • Helps the body cope with stress,depression and anxiety
  • Helps maintain a healthy weight andbuilds lean muscle tissue
  • Improves slee p and concentration levels

Walking is the most recommended form of exercise as it is low impact, economical and easy to do. There are now many walking clubs and routes that can help you feel motivated and monitor your progress.

Checkout the Irish Heart Foundation’s Sli na Slainte (Path to Health) walking programmes –  www.irishheart.ie

Dance classes have also become a very popular way to stay fit while having fun. There are ‘cardio Salsa’ classes available in many VEC colleges, community centres and dance schools. These are designed so that you don’t need a partner or any special clothes.

The largest dance school in Ireland, Stepping Out (www.steppingout.ie) provides over 30 different Salsa Slims classes. The classes last for an hour and are taught by energetic, fun instructors. The aim is to have a good workout while learning to dance and having fun.

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Jul
14

Walking: Part III (Improve Your Style!)

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If you’ve followed my advice in the last issue of the Newsletter, then hopefully you should be now walking for 30 minutes three to four times a week (in fact, the Irish Heart Foundation recommends a minimum of 30 minutes 5 days a week so try to aim for that level). You should also be increasing your endurance by introducing interval training (picking up your pace for five minutes and slowing down, then picking up again etc.,). If you have followed my plan, the chances are that you have lost a few excess pounds, you have increased your aerobic fitness, you have toned up and you feel better in yourself overall (walking also has many psychological benefits!).
This month I’d like you to go that extra bit by working on your walking style while picking up the speed once more (remember that you should still be able to hold a conversation though!). Here are some tips to focus on:
1. Be aware of your posture – walk tall, look forward (not at the ground) and keep your chin and shoulders level and your head up.
Focus into the horizon, not downward. Keep your chest raised and your shoulders relaxed (down, back and relaxed). Imagine a string tied to the top of your head, pulling it gently upwards.
2. Swing your arms – first, bend your arms to almost a 90 degree angle. Next, cup your hands gently and swing arms front to back (not side to side). Do not swing elbows higher than your sternum (breast bone). Swing your arms faster and your feet will follow.
3. Tighten your muscles – specifically, your abdominal (stomach) and gluteal (buttock) muscles. Flatten your back and tilt your pelvis slightly forward.
4. Focus on your feet – land on your heel, roll through the step and push off with your toes. Use the natural spring of your calf muscles to propel you forwards.
5. Breathe naturally – take deep, rhythmic breaths to get the maximum amount of oxygen through your system. Walk fast enough that your breathing is increased yet you are not out of breath.

If you’ve followed my advice in the last issue of the Newsletter, then hopefully you should be now walking for 30 minutes three to four times a week (in fact, the Irish Heart Foundation recommends a minimum of 30 minutes 5 days a week so try to aim for that level). You should also be increasing your endurance by introducing interval training (picking up your pace for five minutes and slowing down, then picking up again etc.,).

If you have followed my plan, the chances are that you have lost a few excess pounds, you have increased your aerobic fitness, you have toned up and you feel better in yourself overall (walking also has many psychological benefits!).

This month I’d like you to go that extra bit by working on your walking style while picking up the speed once more (remember that you should still be able to hold a conversation though!). Here are some tips to focus on:

Read More→

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Apr
14

Walking for Life / Route of the Month

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Remember that the greatest benefits of walking come with time – soon you will be fitter and healthier than you have been in years.
To help keep you motivated, you could keep a diary which logs the dates and distances of your walks, or the scenery that you took in during your walk.
Some people enjoy the extra kick of motivation that a pedometer gives them. Research shows that any tools to help boost motivation, such as the pedometer, can increase the likelihood of sticking to an exercise programme.
That’s why I recommend some of my clients to buy and use a pedometer on a regular basis. It is a continual reminder of how
well you are doing and how many steps you have to build up to each week to reach your own, personal target.
For good health it is recommended that we take 10,000 steps each day, however many of us are currently well below that level – it is common for many of my clients to be taking only 3,000 steps a day before they come to see me for their pedometer. Then, within just a few weeks, they are motivated when they see how easy it is to build up to the 10,000 steps.
Contact the Irish Heart Foundation (Tel: 01 668 5001) or your local sports shop to purchase a pedometer and to go about recording your results.

Remember that the greatest benefits of walking come with time – soon you will be fitter and healthier than you have been in years.

To help keep you motivated, you could keep a diary which logs the dates and distances of your walks, or the scenery that you took in during your walk.

Some people enjoy the extra kick of motivation that a pedometer gives them. Research shows that any tools to help boost motivation, such as the pedometer, can increase the likelihood of sticking to an exercise programme.

That’s why I recommend some of my clients to buy and use a pedometer on a regular basis. It is a continual reminder of how well you are doing and how many steps you have to build up to each week to reach your own, personal target.

For good health it is recommended that we take 10,000 steps each day, however many of us are currently well below that level – it is common for many of my clients to be taking only 3,000 steps a day before they come to see me for their pedometer. Then, within just a few weeks, they are motivated when they see how easy it is to build up to the 10,000 steps.

Contact the Irish Heart Foundation (Tel: 01 668 5001) or your local sports shop to purchase a pedometer and to go about recording your results.

Route of the Month: Ballinastoe Slí na Sláinte

(in Roundwood, Wicklow)

Read More→

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Jan
06

Slí na Sláinte – Walking Routes

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Slí na Sláinte is a unique walking
initiative developed by the Irish Heart
Foundation charity to encourage
walking among all ages by providing
clearly marked routes of achievable
distances all over the country.
We have chosen the Cruagh Wood Slí na Sláinte, in
Stepaside, for this issue of the Newsletter. The route is 4km
in length and can be walked in either direction. It starts at the
barrier beside the car park and follows the forest road through
larch trees. Walking the loop in a clockwise direction, the road
then passes through Sitka spruce. The road then climbs gradually
uphill on past the fi rst km mark. As one approaches the top of
the hill, there is young Sitka spruce and wonderful views of the
Tibradden Mountain. At the 2km mark, one passes the Cruagh
Mountain Access Route bog bridge, providing access to the
open mountain. Here there are fantastic views of Dublin city,
Dollymount Strand and Howth Head. The forest road gradually
descends through the spruce forest and then through the larch
forest back to the car park.
Visit www.irishheart.ie for more routes or, for further
information, contact Edel Byrne, Slí na Sláinte National
Coordinator at the Irish Heart Foundation on 01 668 5001.

Slí na Sláinte is a unique walking initiative developed by the Irish Heart Foundation charity to encourage walking among all ages by providing clearly marked routes of achievable distances all over the country.

We have chosen the Cruagh Wood Slí na Sláinte, in Stepaside, for this issue of the Newsletter. The route is 4km in length and can be walked in either direction. It starts at the barrier beside the car park and follows the forest road through larch trees. Walking the loop in a clockwise direction, the road then passes through Sitka spruce. The road then climbs gradually uphill on past the first km mark. As one approaches the top of the hill, there is young Sitka spruce and wonderful views of the Tibradden Mountain. At the 2km mark, one passes the Cruagh Mountain Access Route bog bridge, providing access to the open mountain. Here there are fantastic views of Dublin city, Dollymount Strand and Howth Head. The forest road gradually descends through the spruce forest and then through the larch forest back to the car park.

Read More→

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Regular walking is perhaps one of the best forms of activity as it is at a moderate intensity and therefore it impacts positively on the risk factors for heart disease, obesity, diabetes and even some cancers. Perhaps one of the real benefits is
that people perceive exercise as relatively easy, so they are more likely to get up and go out for a walk as opposed to visiting a gym.
Walkers report that they feel better about themselves, have more confidence, are more alert and enjoy better sleeping patterns – surely that’s reason enough! Also, while it’s true that walking doesn’t burn calories as quickly as jogging or other high-intensity activities, dozens of studies have shown it to be a very effective weight-loss tool. A study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association found that brisk walking is very effective for reducing deep abdominal fat, the most dangerous kind of fat in terms of heart health.
The American College of Sports Medicine recommends that a person should accumulate at least 30 minutes of moderately intensive physical activity on most,preferably all, days of the week. Next month we will show you how to challenge yourself further each time, by introducing variety into your walks, using new walking techniques and even perhaps trying a slow jog for some.
“If someone has not exercised for a while, I suggest that they start with 30 minutes, but then build up to 50 minutes by the end of the Christmas holidays,” says Elaine.
“This means that they are starting the New Year with good habits already in place!” Remember that it is always sensible to talk to your GP before embarking on a new exercise programme, particularly if you have a history of medical problems.

Regular walking is perhaps one of the best forms of activity as it is at a moderate intensity and therefore it impacts positively on the risk factors for heart disease, obesity, diabetes and even some cancers. Perhaps one of the real benefits is that people perceive exercise as relatively easy, so they are more likely to get up and go out for a walk as opposed to visiting a gym.

Read More→

Categories : Exercise Tips
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“Measuring your heart rate is a great way to assess your current level of fitness and also gives you a fitness goal to work towards.”

20_iStock_000006062581_Medium_SitUpsTo optimise the benefits of aerobic exercise, it is ideal to keep your heart rate between 50 percent and 85 percent of your estimated maximum heart rate.

Maximum heart rate is calculated as 220 – your age.

For example, if you’re 45, your maximum heart rate is 220 – 45, or 175 beats per minute. Fifty percent of this maximum heart rate is 87.5 beats per minute, which you would round up to 88 beats per minute; 85 percent is 149 beats per minute.

Measure your pulse either on your neck or on your wrist. Be sure not to use your thumb, because your thumb has a pulse of its own. And don’t press too hard on your neck; this may give you a distorted heart rate count.

Count the beats for 15 seconds and multiply by four.

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Nov
19

Slí na Slainte – Walking Routes

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Slí na Sláinte is a unique walking initiative developed by the Irish Heart Foundation charity to encourage walking among all ages by providing clearly marked routes of achievable distances all over the country. The routes are mapped out with brightly coloured signposts around towns, in parks, along canals and they are usually between 3k and 6k in length.

As the national charity supporting people with heart disease and stroke, the Irish Heart Foundation walking routes are used to encourage adults to achieve the recommended 30 minutes of physical activity five days a week for heart health. Regular walking keeps your heart strong, improves muscle strength, helps to manage your weight and makes you feel good.

We will be featuring a selection of Slí na Slainte routes (with maps) over the coming newsletters. Keep an eye on the website www.irishheart.ie for a route near you or that may be of interest to a friend or family member. To help develop a route near you or for further information, please contact Edel Byrne, Slí na Sláinte National Coordinator at the Irish Heart Foundation on 01 668 5001.

Corkagh Park Route

sli_na_slainte

This month we have chosen the Corkagh Park Slí na Sláinte in Clondalkin, which is set in 300 acres of lush parkland. A lovely day out, take along the map or look out for the colourful Slí na Sláinte signposts situated at 1 km intervals to guide you along the leafy route. The scenic route runs next to the Naas Road stretching almost a mile to the village of Clondalkin itself, offering panoramic views through the park to the foothills of the Dublin and Wicklow Mountains. The 2.8km circular route follows a beautiful path along the edge of the park. Starting close to the St. Johns Road entrance, the route continues along by lakes, passing the baseball fields and walled garden before opening on to the tree lined Oak Avenue. The route then veers left, along a path with spectacular views over the park and surrounding countryside before coming back to the starting point.

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About Elaine

Elaine graduated from Trinity College with a B.Sc., (Hons) in Human Nutrition and Dietetics. She gained wide experience working as clinical nutritionist in several hospitals prior to establishing her first private dietetic clinic in 1992.

Private Practice Experience
Elaine has gained vast experience specialising in providing private individual dietetic consultations for her clients in her clinics for the past 17 years. In recent years, her main areas of interest are weight management, obesity, diabetes, heart disease and nutrition and gastro-enterology.

Elaine is an active member of the INDI and was chairperson of the Irish Nutrition and Dietetic weight management interest group from 2005 to 2007.

Dietetic and Nutrition Consultancy
Elaine has provided dietetic consultancy to a wide range of industries including private hospitals, hotels and catering companies. She has designed, piloted, implemented and coordinated workplace wellbeing programmes for several prominent companies and large international corporations.