Jan
19

Practical Pointers: Reduce Salt – Make Your Own Stock

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The maximum recommended daily allowance for salt is 6g, which is about a teaspoon. Any more than this poses a threat to our health,
especially blood pressure. Statistics from Safe Food show that we are consuming on average twice this amount.
The most common culprit is ‘hidden’ salts in processed foods. Stock cubes and powders are one of the saltiest products that we use, especially in the cold season when we are making soups and stews. When buying stock cubes choose a brand that has low salt and additive free versions.
Making your own vegetable stock also helps prevent food waste as you can use up veggies that may be looking a little wilted and sad.
To make your own vegetable stock take onions, carrots and celery as a base and if you have tomatoes, fennel, parsley stalks, rosemary stalks, thyme and leeks add these too. Avoid smelly
vegetables like cabbage, broccoli and cauliflower. Throw in some
dried aromatics like bay leaves, peppercorns and some mustard
seeds if you like a little heat. Cover with plenty of water, bring to the boil then simmer for 20 minutes. Scoop off any scum floating on the surface, strain and discard the vegetables. Use or freeze as needed.
To make a chicken stock, simply gather your chicken bones and freeze them until you have enough. Add to the basic vegetable
stock recipe and simmer for 45 minutes. Again, scoop off any scum
and strain. If you need a stronger tasting stock, you can reduce it down by boiling after you have strained it. This would be advisable for sauces and gravies but not necessary for soup.

make-you-own-stockThe maximum recommended daily allowance for salt is 6g, which is about a teaspoon. Any more than this poses a threat to our health, especially blood pressure. Statistics from Safe Food show that we are consuming on average twice this amount.

The most common culprit is ‘hidden’ salts in processed foods. Stock cubes and powders are one of the saltiest products that we use, especially in the cold season when we are making soups and stews. When buying stock cubes choose a brand that has low salt and additive free versions.

Making your own vegetable stock also helps prevent food waste as you can use up veggies that may be looking a little wilted and sad.

To make your own vegetable stock take onions, carrots and celery as a base and if you have tomatoes, fennel, parsley stalks, rosemary stalks, thyme and leeks add these too. Avoid smelly vegetables like cabbage, broccoli and cauliflower. Throw in some dried aromatics like bay leaves, peppercorns and some mustard seeds if you like a little heat. Cover with plenty of water, bring to the boil then simmer for 20 minutes. Scoop off any scum floating on the surface, strain and discard the vegetables. Use or freeze as needed.

To make a chicken stock, simply gather your chicken bones and freeze them until you have enough. Add to the basic vegetable stock recipe and simmer for 45 minutes. Again, scoop off any scum and strain. If you need a stronger tasting stock, you can reduce it down by boiling after you have strained it. This would be advisable for sauces and gravies but not necessary for soup.

Categories : Recipes, Soups

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About Elaine

Elaine graduated from Trinity College with a B.Sc., (Hons) in Human Nutrition and Dietetics. She gained wide experience working as clinical nutritionist in several hospitals prior to establishing her first private dietetic clinic in 1992.

Private Practice Experience
Elaine has gained vast experience specialising in providing private individual dietetic consultations for her clients in her clinics for the past 17 years. In recent years, her main areas of interest are weight management, obesity, diabetes, heart disease and nutrition and gastro-enterology.

Elaine is an active member of the INDI and was chairperson of the Irish Nutrition and Dietetic weight management interest group from 2005 to 2007.

Dietetic and Nutrition Consultancy
Elaine has provided dietetic consultancy to a wide range of industries including private hospitals, hotels and catering companies. She has designed, piloted, implemented and coordinated workplace wellbeing programmes for several prominent companies and large international corporations.