Apr
14

Superfoods – Part 2

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In the last issue of our newsletter, I gave you five top superfoods to include in your diet – namely, tomatoes, spinach, mangoes, Brazil nuts and salmon. Here are the next five top superfoods to include in your supermarket shopping this week – see my next newsletter for a further five!
Red and orange peppers – peppers are an excellent source of vitamin C (just half a red pepper provides you with all the vitamin C you need in one day) in addition to providing useful sources of flavanoids and beta-carotene (see my recipe using peppers on this page!)
Garlic – full of pungent, active phytochemicals called allylic sulphides which act as powerful antioxidants which may help to ward off cell damage in the body.
Broccoli – this cruciferous vegetable is known for its sulphoraphane content, a phytochemical which helps to prevent free radical damage, as well as its folic acid and vitamin C content.
Onions – onions contain allium compounds and a phytochemical known as quercetin (especially high in red onions), both of which are strong antioxidants capable of fighting cell damage within the body.
Sunflower seeds – these seeds are particularly rich in the powerful antioxidant vitamin E and also provide healthy essential fatty acids.
What are antioxidants? – they are substances or nutrients in our foods which can prevent or slow the oxidative damage to our body.

ripe garlic fruits with green parsley leavesIn the last issue of our newsletter, I gave you five top superfoods to include in your diet – namely, tomatoes, spinach, mangoes, Brazil nuts and salmon. Here are the next five top superfoods to include in your supermarket shopping this week – see my next newsletter for a further five!

Red and orange peppers - peppers are an excellent source of vitamin C (just half a red pepper provides you with all the vitamin C you need in one day) in addition to providing useful sources of flavanoids and beta-carotene (see my recipe using peppers on this page!)

Garlic – full of pungent, active phytochemicals called allylic sulphides which act as powerful antioxidants which may help to ward off cell damage in the body.

Broccoli – this cruciferous vegetable is known for its sulphoraphane content, a phytochemical which helps to prevent free radical damage, as well as its folic acid and vitamin C content.

Onions – onions contain allium compounds and a phytochemical known as quercetin (especially high in red onions), both of which are strong antioxidants capable of fighting cell damage within the body.

Sunflower seeds - these seeds are particularly rich in the powerful antioxidant vitamin E and also provide healthy essential fatty acids.

What are antioxidants? – they are substances or nutrients in our foods which can prevent or slow the oxidative damage to our body.

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About Elaine

Elaine graduated from Trinity College with a B.Sc., (Hons) in Human Nutrition and Dietetics. She gained wide experience working as clinical nutritionist in several hospitals prior to establishing her first private dietetic clinic in 1992.

Private Practice Experience
Elaine has gained vast experience specialising in providing private individual dietetic consultations for her clients in her clinics for the past 17 years. In recent years, her main areas of interest are weight management, obesity, diabetes, heart disease and nutrition and gastro-enterology.

Elaine is an active member of the INDI and was chairperson of the Irish Nutrition and Dietetic weight management interest group from 2005 to 2007.

Dietetic and Nutrition Consultancy
Elaine has provided dietetic consultancy to a wide range of industries including private hospitals, hotels and catering companies. She has designed, piloted, implemented and coordinated workplace wellbeing programmes for several prominent companies and large international corporations.